Who We Are

In May 1981, 12 people met to form PROMISE, an acronym for “Parents and Relatives Of the Mentally Ill Supporting Each other.” By 1984, PROMISE had grown to include a Board of Directors with by-laws, incorporation as a non-profit, and had become a member of NAMI-NYS and the national NAMI organization. Eventually the name was changed to NAMI-PROMISE and most recently to NAMI Syracuse.

Today, NAMI Syracuse is a vital and active non-profit advocacy organization with a membership of over 500 families. In 1998, PROMISE Residential Project, Inc. was established. To date, two residences have been purchased and serve the housing needs of several clients.

NAMI Syracuse provides:

  • Monthly Support Group Meetings.
  • Information and Resources through our NAMI Syracuse office.
  • Bimonthly NAMI Syracuse newsletter and website: namisyracuse.org.
  • Referral to free 12 week family support and education classes.
  • Information about NAMI and/or speakers to participate in local health fairs and other community events.
  • Breaking the Silence lesson plans to upper elementary, middle, and high school students which teaches our students about mental illness and the stigma associated with mental illness.
  • Events: yearly Children’s Conference, Fall Educational Conference, “SEE ME” art show, Touched with Fire Concert, Annual Picnic, and Holiday party.

5 thoughts on “Who We Are

    • NAMI is not for children, per se. We are primarily an organization that supports family members with loved ones who struggle with mental illness. Please call our office at 315-487-2085; Mary will be happy to let you know about different services in the area for you and your daughter.

  1. I have a son who is 55 years old and presently is going through his second major manic episode. He has been manic now for 5 months after being in deep depression for over 10 years. The problem is, he likes being manic instead of depressed. He refuses to take meds now because to him that means going back to depression. In the mean time he has done outrageous things, including destroying any chance of a secure future. As parents we feel helpless.

  2. I was wondering what type of opportunities were available with NAMI Syracuse for individuals who were simply looking to becoming move involved in NAMI and advocacy?

    Thank you!

  3. I’m glad to know at last, after years of dealings with a rotating roster of ‘Case’ and ‘Care’ management service people and agencies, that Syracuse has its own N.A.M.I. office. (Not one of over half-a-dozen psychological health assistance ‘Managers’ from Dpt. of Social Services, V.E.S.I.D., A.R.I.S.E., and Catholic Charities to the new A.C.A. “Health Homes Program” had ever mentioned your agency’s existence–utterly baffling.)

    My question is whether your office helps people with disabilities who’ve been exploited by health care practices and service agencies to find legal representation that will afford them access to some opportunities of any justice. A Care Manager at the Syracuse A.C.R. Health office has recently informed me that N.A.M.I. Syracuse does provide some community services of this variety.

    Thank you for your on-going efforts, much needed as overwhelmingly neglected, ignored and even denied by our region at large.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *